Search Results for: teaching with emotion

Emotions And English Language Teaching

Emotions and English Language Teaching PDF

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Author: Sarah Benesch
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317566211
Size: 41.41 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Foreign Language Study
Languages : en
Pages : 196
View: 3991

Taking a critical approach that considers the role of power, and resistance to power, in teachers’ affective lives, Sarah Benesch examines the relationship between English language teaching and emotions in postsecondary classrooms. The exploration takes into account implicit feeling rules that may drive institutional expectations of teacher performance and affect teachers’ responses to and decisions about pedagogical matters. Based on interviews with postsecondary English language teachers, the book analyzes ways in which they negotiate tension—theorized as emotion labor—between feeling rules and teachers’ professional training and/or experience, in particularly challenging areas of teaching: high-stakes literacy testing; responding to student writing; plagiarism; and attendance. Discussion of this rich interview data offers an expanded and nuanced understanding of English language teaching, one positing teachers’ emotion labor as a framework for theorizing emotions critically and as a tool of teacher agency and resistance.


Teaching With Emotion

Teaching with Emotion PDF

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Author: Michalinos Zembylas
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1607526727
Size: 34.71 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 289
View: 2898

The purpose of this book is to provide new theoretical, methodological and empirical directions in research on teacher emotion. An attempt is made to encourage a missing conversation in the area of emotions in teaching, by invoking a discussion of ideas that explore how discursive, political and cultural aspects define the experience of teacher emotion. I begin to build an analysis upon which the role of emotion, emotional rules and emotional labor in curriculum and teaching might be investigated. This book includes both conceptual chapters and chapters based on empirical work—and, in particular, a three-year ethnographic study with an early childhood teacher in the context of science teaching—that together illustrate new approaches and perspectives in researching and theorizing about emotion in teaching Essentially, then, there are two overlapping aims in this book. First, to critically examine some of the contemporary ways in which emotions have been conceptualized and understood in teaching; and second, to explore the role of emotion in teaching through different methodologies and theorizations.


Teaching Children Empathy

Teaching Children Empathy PDF

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Author: Tonia Caselman
Publisher: Youthlight
ISBN: 9781598500141
Size: 65.25 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 131
View: 672

Helping children develop greater empathy-related awareness and skill can help prevent negative social behaviors such as bullying, meanness, and alienation. Empathy is a fundamental social emotion because it brings a sense of emotional connection to others. It moves us past the self and into relational awareness. It is this awareness that is not only basic to all healthy relationships; it is the root of prosocial behavior, altruism, kindness and peace. Empathy has cognitive, affective and behavioral components that can be learned and improved upon by children. Each topic-related lesson includes five inviting worksheets that can be reproduced and used repeatedly with elementary school-aged students.


Emotion And School

Emotion and School PDF

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Author: Melissa Newberry
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 1781906513
Size: 45.65 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 283
View: 479

Emotion and School Understanding How the Hidden Curriculum Influences Relationships, Leadership, Teaching, and Learning reports the history, developments, applications and possible future directions of relational and emotion-focused school research from North America, Asia-Pacific and Europe. It begins by scoping the field from both a psychological and sociological perspective. The chapters frame the key debates in the research literature while adding the unique perspective of experts from the field, before honing in on the school: the administration context, teacher context and student context. The book explores the contests within the field, including psychological and socio-cultural knowledges, individual and collectives, emotions as inputs/outcomes, and the false binary of emotions and rational thought. The middle sections of the book take these perspectives into the field to see how they operate in schools. First, methods for identifying and responding to emotion and relationships in schools are presented. Second, the positive and negative products of emotions and emotion work are outlined and their effects on relationships and school functioning are discussed. The book provides readers with new insights into the hidden curriculum. It offers new ways of working with emotion in a variety of relationships for positive outcomes: the selection and induction of teachers; the role of emotions in leading; emotional and emotion learning; and, the inter-relationship between emotions, school culture, classroom and staffroom dynamics.


The Effects Of Emotional Traits In Teaching Performance

The Effects of Emotional Traits in Teaching Performance PDF

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Author: Yenny Hoyos
Publisher: Grin Publishing
ISBN: 9783668423404
Size: 35.78 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 64
View: 3141

Bachelor Thesis from the year 2016 in the subject Sociology - Work, Profession, Education, Organisation, grade: 4.8, University of Colombo (UNICA), language: English, abstract: The purpose of this study is to illustrate some of the effects of negative emotional traits in the teaching performance of two English seven and eight grade teachers with forty students each in a public school in Suba, Bogota. The work focused on three negative emotional traits (frustration, anxiety and lack of creativity) that are the core of a negative class environment. The research of Ferguson, Frost& Hall (2012) explores some of the physical effects such as increased blood pressure, anger, headaches, and some psychological effects such as anxiety, nervousness, tension, frustration and panic, that some teachers might experience when they are exposed to situations of high amount of stress. Furthermore, those effects can affect teacher performance when teaching classes. Two case studies described the situations that affect teachers' performance, how teachers reacted when experiencing those situations and what the outcomes are in the classroom environment. The main situations found during the study are related with students' behavior, students' attitude about class activities, school demands regarding class structure and the amount of English use during classes.


New Understandings Of Teacher S Work

New Understandings of Teacher s Work PDF

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Author: Christopher Day
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9789400705456
Size: 35.95 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 256
View: 2316

Within educational research that seeks to understand the quality and effectiveness of teachers and school, the role emotions play in educational change and school improvement has become a subject of increasing importance. In this book, scholars from around the world explore the connections between teaching, teacher education, teacher emotions, educational change and school leadership. (For this text, “teacher” encompasses pre-service teachers, in-service teachers and headteachers, or principals). New Understandings of Teacher’s Work: Emotions and Educational Change is divided into four themes: educational change; teachers and teaching; teacher education; and emotions in leadership. The chapters address the key basic and substantive issues relative to the central emotional themes of the following: teachers’ lives and careers in teaching; the role emotions play in teachers’ work; lives and leadership roles in the context of educational reform; the working conditions; the context-specific dynamics of reform work; school/teacher cultures; individual biographies that affect teachers’ emotional well-being; and the implications for the management and leadership of educational change, and for development, of teacher education.


Negotiating The Self

Negotiating the Self PDF

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Author: Kate Evans
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113670356X
Size: 52.38 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 202
View: 4938

First Published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.


The Emotional Rollercoaster Of Language Teaching

The Emotional Rollercoaster of Language Teaching PDF

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Author: Christina Gkonou
Publisher: Multilingual Matters
ISBN: 1788928350
Size: 67.40 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 296
View: 3887

This book focuses on the emotional complexity of language teaching and how the diverse emotions that teachers experience while teaching are shaped and function. The book is based on the premise that teaching is not just about the transmission of academic knowledge but also about inspiring students, building rapport with them, creating relationships based on empathy and trust, being patient and most importantly controlling one’s own emotions and being able to influence students’ emotions in a positive way. The book covers a range of emotion-related topics on both positive and negative emotions which are relevant to language teaching including emotional labour, burnout, emotion regulation, resilience, emotional intelligence and wellbeing among others. These topics are studied within a wide range of contexts such as teacher education programmes, tertiary education, CLIL and action research settings, and primary and secondary schools across different countries. The book will appeal to any student, researcher, teacher or policymaker who is interested in research on the psychological aspects of foreign language teaching.


Advances In Teacher Emotion Research

Advances in Teacher Emotion Research PDF

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Author: Paul A. Schutz
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781441905642
Size: 66.44 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 390
View: 6639

Some reports estimate that nearly 50% of teachers entering the profession leave within the first five years (Alliance for Excellent Education 2004; Ingersoll, 2003; Quality Counts 2000). One explanation of why teachers leave the profession so early in their career might be related to the emotional nature of the teaching profession. For example, teaching is an occupation that involves considerable emotional labor. Emotional labor involves the effort, planning, and control teachers need to express organizationally desired emotions during interpersonal transactions. As such, emotional labor has been associated with job dissatisfaction, health symptoms and emotional exhaustion, which are key components of burnout and related to teachers who drop out of the profession. Research into emotional labor in teaching and other aspects of teachers’ emotions is becoming increasingly important not only because of the growing number of teachers leaving the profession, but also because unpleasant classroom emotions have considerable implications for student learning, school climate and the quality of education in general. Using a variety of different methodological and theoretical approaches, the authors in this edited volume, Advances in Teacher Emotion Research: The Impact on Teachers’ Lives, provide a systematic overview that enriches our understanding of the role of emotions in teachers’ professional lives and work. More specifically, the authors discuss inquiry related to teachers’ emotions in educational reform, teacher identity, student involvement, race/class/gender issues, school administration and inspection, emotional labor, teacher burnout and several other related issues. This volume, then, represents the accumulation of different epistemological and theoretical positions related to inquiry on teachers’ emotions, acknowledging that emotions are core components of teachers’ lives. Advances in Teacher Emotion Research takes an eclectic look at teacher emotions, presenting current research from diverse perspectives, thereby making this volume a significant contribution to the field.


Leading With Teacher Emotions In Mind

Leading With Teacher Emotions in Mind PDF

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Author: Kenneth Leithwood
Publisher: Corwin Press
ISBN: 1452294224
Size: 79.89 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 192
View: 3217

This research-based study helps administrators create a school environment that responds to teacher emotions and results in higher teacher retention, instructional effectiveness, and student achievement.


Affect And Legal Education

Affect and Legal Education PDF

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Author: Caroline Maughan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317184785
Size: 53.23 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 338
View: 7073

The place of emotion in legal education is rarely discussed or analysed, and we do not have to seek far for the reasons. The difficulty of interdisciplinary research, the technicisation of legal education itself, the view that affect is irrational and antithetical to core western ideals of rationality - all this has made the subject of emotion in legal education invisible. Yet the educational literature on emotion proves how essential it is to student learning and to the professional lives of teachers. This text, the first full-length book study of the subject, seeks to make emotion a central topic of research for legal educators, and restore the power of emotion in our teaching and learning. Part 1 focuses on the contribution that neuroscience can make to legal learning, a theme that is carried through other chapters in the book. Part 2 explores the role of emotion in the working lives of academics and clinical staff, while Part 3 analyses the ways in which emotion can be used in learning and teaching. The book, interdisciplinary and wide-ranging in its reference, breaks new ground in its analysis of the educational lifeworld of situations, communities, actors and interactions in legal education.


Teaching And Emotion

Teaching and Emotion PDF

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Author: Harriet L. Schwartz
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 28.85 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Educational psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 107
View: 597



Doing Emotion

Doing Emotion PDF

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Author: Laura R. Micciche
Publisher: Boynton/Cook
ISBN:
Size: 38.95 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 127
View: 2143

That the emotional realities of teaching have changed significantly over the past decade is undeniable; Doing Emotion provides much needed guidance both on understanding these changes and on imagining a responsive pedagogy for these emotionally fraught times - a pedagogy grounded not in fear but in hope for better times. - Richard E. Miller For Laura Micciche, emotion is neither the enemy of reason nor an irrational response to actions and ideas. Rather, she argues in the provocative and groundbreaking Doing Emotion that emotion is integral to research, discussion, analysis, and argument - that is, to the essential fabric of rhetoric and composition. Doing Emotion argues for a rhetoric of emotion by foregrounding the idea that emotions are performative - enacted and embodied in our social interactions, produced between and among individuals and textual objects. Emotion is something we do, rather than something we have. Micciche explores the implications of this claim in the context of writing classrooms, administrative structures, and the formation of disciplinary identity. Drawing upon current research in emotion studies, performance studies, and feminist rhetorical studies, Micciche argues that a shift in our thinking about emotion leads to productive possibilities for teaching and learning. Rather than repressing and denying emotionality, Micciche demands that we acknowledge its constitutive role in our professional and pedagogical lives as well as in our evolving understandings of textual and extralinguistic meanings.


Leading With Teacher Emotions In Mind

Leading With Teacher Emotions in Mind PDF

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Author: Kenneth Leithwood
Publisher: Corwin
ISBN: 9781412941457
Size: 42.54 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 192
View: 6738

This research-based study helps administrators create a school environment that responds to teacher emotions and results in higher teacher retention, instructional effectiveness, and student achievement.


The Feeling Of Teaching

The Feeling of Teaching PDF

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Author: Elizabeth D. Burris
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781619276192
Size: 67.79 MB
Format: PDF
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 250
View: 5221

The Feeling of Teaching is part of a larger project, Teaching through Emotions (TTE), developed by the author, Elizabeth Burris. The project is based on these premises: * that teaching and learning depend on relationships; * that teaching is fraught with emotion, often negative; * that working through emotions can help illuminate the nature of classroom relationships, which points to ways teachers can improve their teaching; and * that teachers need support in surviving and understanding the emotions and relationships that necessarily accompany teaching and learning. This book describes the TTE approach to teaching. Through stories from real-life classrooms, the book demonstrates how teachers can turn negative experiences into positive, lasting learning for their students. In the chapter on pushed buttons, teachers learn how to recognize even subtle instances of acting out and the ways students and others defend against anxiety. In the chapter on insults and compliments, teachers learn the value of not taking students personally so students can use them for cognitive and emotional development. In the chapter on crossed boundaries, teachers explore how they and their students sometimes move into each other's "circles" and wreak havoc, including indulging in the urge to take revenge. And in the chapter on power struggles, teachers consider student resistance and several ways to dissolve it. Throughout the book, readers are shown the power of emotion work: practicing self-awareness, describing, looking for good reasons, guessing, self-disclosing, listening, and planning. By doing emotion work, teachers can take full advantage of the emotional and relational data their students are constantly providing to shift their teaching and better attune with the learners in their classrooms. This book shows how such attunement can fundamentally transform teachers and students alike. The TTE approach welcomes emotions, even the most negative ones, and uses them to figure out better ways to relate to students and help them learn what teachers want them to learn. In addition, TTE is a way for teachers to get relief. By acknowledging feelings and working through them to crystal-clear understanding and self-change, TTE allows teachers to connect with students in sometimes shockingly effective and satisfying ways. It can turn misery into joy and amazement. That's what teaching should be about. And it's what this book makes possible.


Emotion Management And Feelings In Teaching And Educational Leadership

Emotion Management and Feelings in Teaching and Educational Leadership PDF

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Author: Izhar Oplatka
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 1787560120
Size: 79.56 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 304
View: 4994

This book highlights the connection between culture and emotion management in teaching and educational leadership and allows researchers from different parts of the world to demonstrate how national and local culture influence the way educational leaders and teachers express their feelings, display their emotion, or suppress emotion publically.


Emotion Motivation And Self Regulation

Emotion  Motivation  and Self regulation PDF

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Author: Nathan C. Hall
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 1781907102
Size: 38.35 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 191
View: 6135

This handbook is a user-friendly resource for pre-service and new practicing teachers outlining theoretical models and empirical research findings concerning the nature and effects of emotions, motivation, and self-regulated learning for students and teachers alike. The authors provide accessible explanations, classroom-based examples and self-reflection exercises, as well as useful advice for new teachers about these psychosocial processes. They address how to measure these processes, what effects they have on personal and academic development, how they manifest in both students and teachers and how teachers can best manage and optimize these critical elements at the classroom level. It is expected that by collecting, distilling, and highlighting the real-world applicability of research on underexplored educational topics (e.g., students? emotions other than anxiety, promoting student autonomy, preventing burnout and attrition in teachers) that empirical findings can be used to improve personal and academic development in students, while also preparing new teachers for the psychological challenges of classroom instruction.


Emotions In Learning Teaching And Leadership

Emotions in Learning  Teaching  and Leadership PDF

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Author: Junjun Chen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1000338517
Size: 30.56 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 232
View: 4613

Emotions are at the core of the educational enterprise but their role is mostly left unexamined. This book explores the role of emotions across students, teachers and school leaders. It showcases current theoretical and empirical research on emotions in educational settings conducted in the Asian context. The book consists of three parts, namely, emotions in learning, emotions in teaching and emotions in leadership. These chapters cover different levels from students (e.g., school, university), to teachers (e.g., pre-service, in-service) and to school leaders (e.g., middle-level teachers, principals). Samples are recruited from a wide range of Asian contexts (e.g., Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR, Mainland China, Singapore and the Philippines). Collectively, the authors use a variety of methods ranging from quantitative to qualitative approaches and demonstrate innovative theoretical work that pushes the boundaries of emotions research forward.


Advances In Teacher Emotion Research

Advances in Teacher Emotion Research PDF

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Author: Paul A. Schutz
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9781441905659
Size: 75.48 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 390
View: 4569

Some reports estimate that nearly 50% of teachers entering the profession leave within the first five years (Alliance for Excellent Education 2004; Ingersoll, 2003; Quality Counts 2000). One explanation of why teachers leave the profession so early in their career might be related to the emotional nature of the teaching profession. For example, teaching is an occupation that involves considerable emotional labor. Emotional labor involves the effort, planning, and control teachers need to express organizationally desired emotions during interpersonal transactions. As such, emotional labor has been associated with job dissatisfaction, health symptoms and emotional exhaustion, which are key components of burnout and related to teachers who drop out of the profession. Research into emotional labor in teaching and other aspects of teachers’ emotions is becoming increasingly important not only because of the growing number of teachers leaving the profession, but also because unpleasant classroom emotions have considerable implications for student learning, school climate and the quality of education in general. Using a variety of different methodological and theoretical approaches, the authors in this edited volume, Advances in Teacher Emotion Research: The Impact on Teachers’ Lives, provide a systematic overview that enriches our understanding of the role of emotions in teachers’ professional lives and work. More specifically, the authors discuss inquiry related to teachers’ emotions in educational reform, teacher identity, student involvement, race/class/gender issues, school administration and inspection, emotional labor, teacher burnout and several other related issues. This volume, then, represents the accumulation of different epistemological and theoretical positions related to inquiry on teachers’ emotions, acknowledging that emotions are core components of teachers’ lives. Advances in Teacher Emotion Research takes an eclectic look at teacher emotions, presenting current research from diverse perspectives, thereby making this volume a significant contribution to the field.


Activity Based Teaching In The Art Museum

Activity Based Teaching in the Art Museum PDF

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Author: Elliott Kai-Kee
Publisher: Getty Publications
ISBN: 1606066331
Size: 64.52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Art
Languages : en
Pages : 184
View: 2295

This groundbreaking book explores why and how to encourage physical and sensory engagement with works of art. An essential resource for museum professionals, teachers, and students, the award winning Teaching in the Art Museum (Getty Publications, 2011) set a new standard in the field of gallery education. This follow-up book blends theory and practice to help educators—from teachers and docents to curators and parents—create meaningful interpretive activities for children and adults. Written by a team of veteran museum educators, Activity-Based Teaching in the Art Museum offers diverse perspectives on embodiment, emotions, empathy, and mindfulness to inspire imaginative, spontaneous interactions that are firmly grounded in history and theory. The authors begin by surveying the emergence of activity-based teaching in the 1960s and 1970s and move on to articulate a theory of play as the cornerstone of their innovative methodology. The volume is replete with sidebars describing activities facilitated with museum visitors of all ages. Table of Contents Introduction Part I History 1 The Modern History of Presence and Meaning A philosophical shift from a language-based understanding of the world to direct, physical interaction with it. 2 A New Age in Museum Education: The 1960s and 1970s A brief history of some of the innovative museum education programs developed in the United States in the late 1960s and 1970s. The sudden and widespread adoption of nondiscursive gallery activities during this period, especially but not exclusively in programs designed for younger students and school groups, expressed the spirit of the times. Part II Theory 3 Starts and Stops Two attempts by American museum educators to articulate a theory for their new, nondiscursive programs: the first deriving from the early work of Project Zero, the Harvard Graduate School of Education program founded by the philosopher Nelson Goodman to study arts learning as a cognitive activity; the second stemming from the work of Viola Spolin, the acclaimed theater educator and coach whose teaching methods, embodied in a series of “theater games,” were detailed in her well-known book Improvisation for the Theater (1963). 4 A Theory of Play in the Museum A theory of play that posits activities in the museum as forms of play that take place in spaces (or “playgrounds”) temporarily designated as such by educators and their adult visitors or students. Play is defined essentially as movement—both physical and imaginary (metaphorical)—toward and away from, around, and inside and outside the works of art that are foregrounded within those spaces. Gallery activities conceived in this way respond to the possibilities that the objects themselves offer for the visitor to explore and engage with them. The particular movements characterizing an activity are crucially conditioned by the object in question; they constitute a process of discovery and learning conceptually distinct from, but supportive of, traditional dialogue-based modes of museum education, which they supplement rather than supplant. Part III Aspects of Play 5 Embodiment, Affordances The idea of embodiment adopted here recognizes that both mind and body are joined in their interactions with things. Investigating works of art thus involves apprehending them physically as well as intellectually—in the sense of responding to the ways in which a particular work allows and even solicits the viewer’s physical grasp of it. 6 Skills Ways in which objects present themselves to us, as viewers, and what we might do in response as they fit with the bodily skills we have developed over the course of our lives. Such skills might be as simple as getting dressed, washing, or eating; or as specialized as doing one’s hair, dancing, playing an instrument, or acting—all of which may allow us to “grasp” and even feel that we inhabit particular works of art. 7 Movement Embodied looking is always looking from somewhere. We apprehend objects as we physically move around and in front of them; they reveal themselves differently as we approach them from different viewpoints. Viewers orient themselves spatially to both the surfaces of objects and to the things and spaces depicte4d in or suggested by representational works of art. Activity-based teaching gets visitors and students to move among the objects—away from them, close to them, and even into them. 8 The Senses Both adult visitors and younger students come to the museum expecting to use their eyes, yet “visual” art appeals to several of the senses at once, though rarely to the same degree. Sculpture, for example, almost always appeals to touch (whether or not that is actually possible or allowed) as well as sight. A painting depicting a scene in which people appear to be talking may induce viewers to not only look but also “listen” to what the figures might be saying. 9 Drawing in the Museum Looking at art with a pencil in hand amplifies viewers’ ability to imaginatively touch and feel their way across and around an artwork. Contour drawing by its nature requires participants to imagine that they are touching the contours of an object beneath the tips of their pencils. Other types of drawing allow viewers to feel their way around objects through observation and movement. 10 Emotion Visitors’ emotional responses to art represent a complex process with many components, from physiological to cognitive, and a particular work of art may elicit a wide range of emotional reactions. This chapter describes specific ways in which museum educators can go well beyond merely asking visitors how a work of art makes them feel. 11 Empathy and Intersubjectivity One aspect of viewers’ emotional responses to art that is often taken for granted, if not neglected altogether: the empathetic connections that human beings make to images of other people. This chapter advocates an approach that prompts viewers to physically engage with the representations of people they see. 12 Mindful Looking Mindfulness involves awareness and attention, both as a conscious practice and as an attitude that gallery teachers can encourage in museum visitors. This is not solely a matter of cultivating the mind, however; it is also a matter of cultivating the body, since mindfulness is only possible when mind and body are in a state of harmonious, relaxed attentiveness. Mindfulness practice in the art museum actively directs the viewer’s focus on the object itself and insists on returning to it over and over; yet it also balances activity with conscious stillness. Afterword Acknowledgments